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What is Xiapex?

The first and only EU-approved nonsurgical treatment for Dupuytren´s contracture.1

Xiapex is the first and only EU-approved nonsurgical treatment option proven in clinical studies to work in adults with Dupuytren’s contracture when a cord can be felt. In two studies, Xiapex helped many people with Dupuytren’s contracture achieve straight or nearly straight fingers and improve their range of motion in the affected finger.1,2,3

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  • What is Xiapex?

    Xiapex is the first and only pharmacological treatment for patients with Dupuytren’s contracture as an alternative to surgery or surgical procedures. Xiapex is indicated for the treatment of Dupuytren’s contracture in adult patients with a palpable cord.1

  • How does Xiapex work?

    Xiapex is a combination of two purified clostridial collagenases for injection that enzymatically disrupts the contracting cord and thus reduces the contraction.1

  • How is Xiapex dosed?

    The recommended dose of Xiapex is 0.58 mg. The total volume of the injection depends on the joint being treated.1 For more information please read the Xiapex Injection Training Brochure.

  • How is Xiapex stored?

    Prior to reconstitution, the vials of Xiapex and diluent should be stored in a refrigerator at 2° to 8°C (36° to 46°F). They should not be frozen. The reconstituted Xiapex solution can be kept at room temperature (20° to 25°C/68° to 77°F) for up to one hour or refrigerated at 2° to 8°C(36° to 46°F) for up to 4 hours prior to administration. If refrigerated, the reconstituted solution should be allowed to return to room temperature for approximately 15 minutes before use.1

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Dupuytren’s disease

Peyronie’s disease